Plymouth folk least likely to haggle!

Holidaymakers from Plymouth are among the least likely to haggle in England, reveals a new poll.

Research carried out by webuyanycar.com’s Negotiation Academy reveals that only 24 per cent of those from the city who went on holiday this summer indulged in a spot of negotiation in a foreign hotspot.

This is way below the national average of 52% and saw more than three quarters of tourists from Plynouth miss out on potential savings that could have stretched their spending money on souvenirs, clothes, day trips and gifts.

The top five cities for negotiation in the UK were revealed by the poll to be Worcester (66% of hagglers), Cardiff (55%), Liverpool (50%), Wolverhampton (47%) and Birmingham (44%).

The most popular items to negotiate your way to a saving on in the markets, souks and bazaars of the world’s summer hotspots are jewellery (43%), souvenirs (42%), clothes (41%), handbags (32%), ornaments (30%), sunglasses (25%) and booze (10%), say those surveyed. More than one third (35%) of those who are taking a foreign break this summer have already planned a bit of holiday haggling into their trip.

The poll revealed that the countries where holidaymakers feel most confident putting their haggling skills to the test are Spain (46%), Turkey (31%), Greece (20%), Egypt (19%), Portugal (17%), France (16%), Morocco (13%) and Thailand (11%).

Places that are considered the best for a holiday haggle are markets (59%), souks and bazaars (26%), shops (8%) and the beach (4%).

The change in air from back home gives bold Brits the courage to kick off the negotiation, with almost one third (31%) saying they initiated the conversation to secure a bargain.

Those questioned also confirmed that there is an expectation of being able to make big savings on marked prices, with the average predicted saving of 28%. A bold 12% were confident of getting goods for half price through haggling, 25% getting at least a third off.

This is in direct contrast to behaviour at home, where six in 10 consumers still lack the confidence to negotiate for money off items on the high street according to the webuyanycar.com survey.

With the average family taking £250 to cover each week of their holiday, these negotiating efforts mean that spending money could be stretched by as much an extra two days simply through savings.

Professor Sandi Mann of the University of Central Lancashire, believes these holiday hagglers should bring their newly-honed skills home – and reap the rewards in everyday life too.

She comments: “Negotiating money off in any situation begins with a state of mind – and if you’ve had success on holiday, it gives you the confidence to bring those skills back with you.

“Remember what worked with the shop owner or market stall holder – you were probably very friendly and relaxed because you were on holiday, for instance. The environment would make you confident to ask for a discount in the first place and It’s likely you were confident enough to state you’d walk away if you couldn’t get the price you wanted as similar items would be on sale in the area.

“These tactics will all stand you in good stead back in the UK and before you know it you can be enjoying the same savings you were able to get on holiday.

“Negotiating is a game and if you learn the rules abroad, it will become second nature in everyday life.”