Plymouth Pavilions staff raise funds for CRY

For many years, Plymouth Pavilions has supported a selection of charities to raise funds and awareness and in 2016, Cardiac Risk in the Young (CRY) was nominated.

Championed by Stewart Woodruff, House Officer at Plymouth Pavilions, and supported by colleagues throughout the venue, a total of £2452.90 was successfully raised for the charity.

Stewart said: “Following the sudden passing of my wife in 2013, the coroner suggested that my children have their hearts monitored. I approached CRY and since then, the support they have provided to my family and I has been fantastic.

“I nominated the charity as a way of saying thank you. I will always be grateful for everything they have done for us during such a difficult and testing time.”

To raise the funds, a 20 mile cycle ride was organised and four members of staff took part, starting from the Plymouth Pavilions and cycling to Clearbrook and back. Alongside this, a week of fancy dress took place and comedian Adam Hills agreed to a bucket collection following his performance.

Stewart continued: “I am really proud of the total amount raised and would like to take this opportunity to thank all of my colleagues for getting involved and for everyone who generously donated. I hope to continue fundraising for CRY in the future.”

Chief Executive of Cardiac Risk in the Young (CRY), Dr Steven Cox, said: “As a charity, we are always immensely grateful to the teams of dedicated fundraisers across the UK who do much to support us in our ongoing mission to prevent cases of young sudden cardiac death.

“Whether a cake bake or a cricket match, running a marathon or taking part in a sponsored walk – we really do value every penny raised and every effort made by our fundraisers. The efforts of Plymouth Pavilions to raise £2,452.90 for the charity is fantastic and will be essential in ensuring that we can achieve our ambitious aims.

“Unfortunately, YSCD is not rare and at least 12 apparently fit and healthy young (aged 35 and under) people in the UK die suddenly from a previously undiagnosed heart condition every week in the UK. In 80% of these cases, there will have been no signs or symptoms of a heart defect until it is too late, which is why CRY believes screening is so vitally important. As such, CRY now tests over 29,000 young people each year, aged between 14 and 35.”

“Anyone interested in booking a screening should visit www.testmyheart.org for more details.”

To find out more about the charity, please visit www.c-r-y.org.uk